Type 2 Diabetes Guide

Green Tea & Diabetes - Research & Results

There has been some research (and plenty of speculation) on the health effects of . Some people have speculated that diabetes, a chronic disease, might be prevented or delayed by drinking lots of green tea. Green tea is packed with antioxidants and has long been used for a variety of health issues.

In one study, green tea was given to diabetic rats for three months. The results showed that blood sugar levels were lowered, and that the tea inhibited the development of diabetic cataracts. The researchers recommended that the the effects of tea should be studied in humans as a simple, natural, and affordable way to prevent diabetes, or delay the disease or its .

Another study was done in Japan that examined the link between drinking green tea (as well as black and oolong teas) and the development of . Researchers found that people who drank 6 or more cups of green tea per day were less likely to develop diabetes than those who drank 1 cup or less per week.

It's important to note that the results of these studies are not conclusive. However, green tea is considered a healthy drink and is also inexpensive and simple to prepare. Thus people may decide that it "doesn't hurt and might help."

To benefit from the effects of green tea, it's suggested that a a 143-pound person needs to drink 4 1/4 - 8 ounce cups of tea every day. Some people believe that by drinking green tea, diabetes may be prevented or delayed and its complications minimized. However, engaging in a healthy lifestyle that includes maintaining a healthy weight, enjoying a wide variety of portion-controlled, nutritious foods, plus a regular exercise program, will do more to or having the disease progress.

 

 

The information on this website is based on our own research and personal experience, and is not a substitute for medical advice. Questions about your health and individual situation should be directed to your doctor.